An excerpt from the article:

Circles of Support respond to parents’ fears, child’s dreams.

By Wendy Singer

A brief history of Circles of Support
Judith Snow and Marsha Forest, both life-long advocates for inclusion, introduced their model of Circles of Support to Canadians in the 1980s.
Snow had a master’s degree in clinical psychology from Toronto’s York University and founded the university’s Centre for Handicapped Students.
After graduating in 1976, her mobility deteriorated and by 1978 she was only able to maneuver her wheelchair with her thumb. Snow had multiple diagnoses, including congenital progressive atrophy of the skeletal muscles due to spinal muscular atrophy.
Forest, Snow and Jack Pearpoint, president of Inclusion Press, created Snow’s Circle of Support to ensure she was able to live independently with her care team and fulfill her dreams, from marriage to spiritual, social, art, relaxation and health. The result was Snow’s ability to fulfill her life vision and provide a model of support that people replicate worldwide. (Read more about Snow’s life story on p. 38).